Travelocity and fraud

Travelocity uses a legal procedure: clickwrap, to protect it from lawsuits.  It has relied on this to protect itself from class action suits in the past.   This protection does not extend to providing impunity from laws against fraud, however.  Providing cover for fraudulent activities of its agents, hopefully, is not a further intent.

Travelocity, like many other services, works on commission.  Individual components of travel should be expected to work seamlessly to provide safe and enjoyable travel.  When these individual choices are made solely on price, the odds are that something will go wrong.  Add ons and fraudulent practices make the good deals not so good.  You need to know: A price that is too good to be true, likely is.  This is the Travelocity weakness.

Fraud is not the only thing to be aware of.  Some travel sites, like Travelocity, do not fully disclose the “unspoken” reason for the rate reduction.  Hidden agendas of lodging companies often justify paying a higher commission to be featured, while still offering a lowered rate.   The traveler should be aware of the property defect, no matter how small.  I personally hate being “pitched to buy into a timeshare.”

Travelocity makes it hard to identify the “defect” in a property.  It is nearly impossible to have a good time on your trip -when you are constantly reminded of your error in judgement.  Princess and the pea, aside: Know your tolerance and stick to it.   I don’t like to book a room and find out that it is an introductory rate for a timeshare pitch.   It may not matter to some, however.    Travelocity errs in not disclosing this.

Airlines are not required to reveal all of the options that are available to you.   You book based on non-changeable ticketing, you are stuck with that.   However, if you prepay for checked baggage and you have arrived less than 5 minutes too late to check that baggage, you should not be told that a $800 upgrade is your only option.   This is criminal.   They will keep your $25 prepaid baggage fee, as well.

This rant is mostly about Economy car rental in Orlando, Florida.   This is the Travelocity featured low price car rental company and the reason for the late arrival at the airport in the first place.   Avoid all off-site airport rental car companies.  Travelocity did not disclose the actual location of the low price rental car company.

Up-sells were expected at the quoted rate.   Scams were not.  Travelocity knows much about their agencies.  The Orange County Sheriff’s office reports that they are called to this particular off site rental car office at least 10 times a month.

In my particular case, I was rented a wet car.  Upon its return, the damage inspector went straight to a small spot on the windshield (outside of the drivers line of view)  grabbed my paperwork and went inside to get his manager.    They popped out with pre-made damage and accident reports for me to sign.    I, of course, refused to sign and was not allowed to board the shuttle to the airport.

This remote rental car location was truly remote.  Uber would not come to pick me up.  The agency counts on people signing …and losing the $150 deposit.  I do not suspect Travelocity getting a cut of this, but they likely receive a higher commission from these guys than the national chains. …ergo the higher ranking in Travelocity.

Access to the Orange County Sheriff’s documents are below.  Most victims do not complain as loudly as I, and simply pay-up.  However I have an additional reason.   While the deputies were watching, the shuttle driver (who was instructed to not allow us to board) drove over our luggage.

You can call 407-254-7280 to request a copy of the event number O161302393 call notes and you can also request all the calls that generated for that Economy Car rental, so you can see how many times the sheriff’s deputies are called there.  Post your poor experiences with Travelocity.  I will personally fund any resulting civil or other action.

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